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In examining the “2008 Blueprint for a Healthier America” readings, it is clear that when the document was created it was designed to inspire and facilitate positive change.

Looking at the current state of health care in the United States do you believe that many of the suggestions were utilized by then President Barrack Obama? 
Since you have only been asked to read through the Guiding Principles, utilizing those headings, what programs have you seen develop and what programs likely will not happen?
Highlight two programs that have been developed and find a scholarly source (Links to an external site.) for each that discusses its growth and impact. ISSUE REPORT

OCTOBER 2008

PREVENTING EPIDEMICS.
PROTECTING PEOPLE.

TFAH BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Lowell Weicker, Jr.
President
Former 3-term U.S. Senator and
Governor of Connecticut

Cynthia M. Harris, PhD, DABT
Vice President
Director and Associate Professor, Institute of
Public Health, Florida A & M University

Margaret A. Hamburg, MD
Secretary
Senior Scientist, Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI)

Patricia Baumann, MS, JD
Treasurer
President and CEO, Bauman Foundation

Gail Christopher, DN
Vice President for Health
WK Kellogg Foundation

John W. Everets

David Fleming, MD
Director of Public Health
Seattle King County, Washington

Arthur Garson, Jr., MD, MPH
Executive Vice President and Provost and the Robert
C. Taylor Professor of Health Science and Public Policy
University of Virginia

Robert T. Harris, MD
Former Chief Medical Officer and
Senior Vice President for Healthcare
BlueCross BlueShield of North Carolina

Alonzo Plough, MA, MPH, PhD
Vice President of Program, Planning and Evaluation
The California Endowment

Theodore Spencer
Project Manager
Natural Resources Defense Council

REPORT AUTHORS

Jeffrey Levi, PhD.
Executive Director
Trust for America’s Health and
Associate Professor in the Department of Health Policy
The George Washington University School of
Public Health and Health Services

Sherry Kaiman
Director of Policy Development
Trust for America’s Health

Chrissie Juliano, MPP
Policy Development Manager
Trust for America’s Health

Laura M. Segal, MA
Director of Public Affairs
Trust for America’s Health

CONTRIBUTORS

Daniella Gratale, MA
Government Relations Manager
Trust for America’s Health

Michael R. Taylor, JD
Research Professor
George Washington School of Public Health
And Health Services

Lynora Williams, MW
Consultant and Principal
Lyric Editorial Services

TRUST FOR AMERICA’S HEALTH IS A NON-PROFIT, NON-PARTISAN ORGANIZATION DEDICATED TO SAVING LIVES AND
MAKING DISEASE PREVENTION A NATIONAL PRIORITY.

This project is supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The opinions expressed are those of the
authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Foundations.

I N T R O D U C T I O N

Section 1
S

E
C

T
IO

N1

S
E

C
T

IO
N1

1

The current public health system is broken.
It is chronically underfunded and outdated.
Modernizing public health is urgently
needed to protect and improve the health of
Americans. Prevention, preparedness, and
public health are vital to the wellbeing of
families, communities, workplace productiv-
ity, U.S. competitiveness, and national secu-
rity. The U.S. is falling behind as Americans
become more unhealthy and less protected,
and health care costs skyrocket.

This Blueprint for a Healthier America is a fed-
eral policy guide for the next President, Ad-

ministration, and Congress with expert rec-
ommendations to revitalize the nation’s abil-
ity to protect the health of all Americans.

Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) under-
took a year-long consensus-building process,
consulting more than 150 leading health ex-
perts and organizations to assemble recom-
mendations for effective ways to modernize
the federal public health system to meet the
range of health challenges we face. TFAH
expresses its gratitude to everyone who was a
part of this process.

Blueprint for a
Healthier America:
MODERNIZING THE FEDERAL PUBLIC
HEALTH SYSTEM TO FOCUS ON
PREVENTION AND PREPAREDNESS

America is facing a health crisis. Even though America spends morethan $2 trillion annually on health care — more than any other nation
in the world — tens of millions of Americans suffer every day from preventable

diseases like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and some forms of cancer that rob

them of their health and quality of life.1 In addition, major vulnerabilities

remain in our preparedness to respond to health emergencies, including

bioterrorism, natural disasters, and emerging infectious diseases.

1S E C T I O N

2

� A vision statement signed by more than
140 leading health organizations that out-
lines principles to make disease and injury
prevention a cornerstone of America’s
health policies.

� Recommendations to improve the infra-
structure of America’s public health sys-
tem – – funding, structure of agencies,
accountability systems, workforce recruit-
ment and retention, and integrating pub-
lic health with health care – – which are all
needed to support the foundation of all
public health programs and services.

� Recommendations from TFAH’s ongoing
initiatives and projects. TFAH issues a se-
ries of policy reports each year to bring
special attention to some of the nation’s
most serious public health problems. A
number of these issues reflect some of the
top health concerns Americans have based
on public opinion research conducted by
Greenberg Rosner Quinlan Research and

Public Opinion Strategies for TFAH, in-
cluding reducing health care costs
through improved disease prevention, the
obesity epidemic, food safety, and pre-
paredness for health emergencies. TFAH
has also focused attention on infant
health, which is a leading indicator for
how healthy a nation is, and addressing
“social determinants” of health, which
looks at why some communities are health-
ier than others and ways to ensure all
Americans have the opportunity to be as
healthy as they can be.

� An Agenda for Modernizing Public Health
paper that defines the need and scope for
a policy agenda to modernize public
health. This paper is the result of a series
of consensus meetings with more than 35
experts and national organizations.

The Blueprint for a Healthier America is supported
by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation.

The Blueprint contains:

3

Section 1: Introduction
A. Our Vision for a Healthier America.

More than 140 leading health organizations
have signed on to a vision statement outlin-
ing the need to make disease and injury pre-
vention the centerpiece of our national
strategy for improving the nation’s health.

Section 2: Infrastructure
Recommendations
A. Funding Public Health for a Healthier

America. TFAH partnered with The New
York Academy of Medicine to convene ex-
perts to inform, review, and develop cost esti-
mates based on the current total
governmental investment in public health and
the level of investment that would be required
to support a modernized public health system.
This section examines potential revenue
streams to support a sustained investment in
public health and examines how government
funding must be a shared responsibility at the
federal, state, and local levels.

B. Federal Health Agencies:
Restructuring for a Healthier America.
Recommendations for creating the optimal
structure necessary to improve public
health programs and services across federal
government agencies, reflecting policy sug-
gestions from former high-ranking public of-
ficials, former Members of Congress, and
other opinion leaders.

C. Accountability for a Healthier America.
Recommendations for improving accounta-
bility across the public health system, so
Americans know what is being done to pro-
tect their health, how healthy the country
and their communities are, and how effec-
tively their tax dollars are being used.

D. Meeting the Public Health Workforce
Crisis: Recruiting the Next Generation
of Public Health Professionals. Recom-
mendations from public health and work-
force experts for ways to recruit and retain
the next generation of public health profes-
sionals.

E. Incorporating Public Health and Pre-
vention into Health Care Reform. Rec-
ommendations on how strong public health
systems and public policies focused on pre-
vention of disease and injury should be the
cornerstone of a health care reform plan.

F. Medicare: Improving Prevention to Help
Contain Costs and Improve Health.
Recommendations for improving prevention
services offered by Medicare and ensuring
Americans are healthier when they reach
Medicare age.

G. Behavioral Health: A Necessary Com-
ponent of a Healthier America.
Recommendations for ensuring behavioral
health concerns are integrated into all public
health programs and services.

Section 3: Trust for America’s
Health Initiative Recommendations
A. Prevention for a Healthier America: In-

vestments in Disease Prevention Yield
Significant Savings, Stronger Communi-
ties. Recommendations for a National Health
and Prevention Strategy

B. F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are
Failing in America. Recommendations for
a National Strategy to Combat Obesity

C. Ready or Not? Protecting the Public’s
Health from Diseases, Disasters, and
Bioterrorism. Recommendations for fixing
the gaps in public health emergency
preparedness.

D. Fixing Food Safety: Protecting America’s
Food Supply from Farm to Fork.
Recommendations for improving food safety.

E. Stamping Out Smoking. Recommenda-
tions for policies to prevent smoking and
other tobacco use.

F. Shortchanging America’s Health. Under-
standing Social Determinants and Recom-
mendations for improving the health of all
Americans, no matter where they live.

G. Healthy Women, Healthy Babies.
Recommendations for improving infant health
in the U.S.

Section 4: Overview of Federal
Public Health Agencies and Budgets

Section 5: Background Resources

A. A Healthier America: An Agenda for
Modernizing Public Health. A summary of
consensus-building meetings where more than
35 leading health experts and national organi-
zations met to define the need and scope for a
policy agenda to modernize public health.

BLUEPRINT FOR A HEALTHIER AMERICA
TABLE OF CONTENTS

4

Julio Abreu, Director of Government
Affairs, Mental Health America

Katie Adamson, Director of Health
Partnerships and Policy, YMCA of the USA

Denise Adams-Simms, MPH, Executive
Director, California Black Health Network

Nancy Adler, PhD, Director, Center for
Health and Community, University of
California, San Francisco

Gregg Albright, Deputy Director, Planning
and Model Programs,California
Department of Transportation

Brian Altman, JD, Director of Public Policy
and Program Development, Suicide
Prevention Action Network USA

Sharon Arnold, PhD, Vice President,
AcademyHealth

Bernie Arons, MD, Executive
Director/CEO, National Development and
Research Institutes, Inc.

Linnea Ashley, MPH, Program
Coordinator, Prevention Institute

Ed Baker, MD, MPH, Director, North
Carolina Institute for Public Health
Research Professor, University of North
Carolina School of Public Health

Polly Bednash, PhD, RN, FANN, Executive
Director, American Association of Colleges
of Nursing

Suzanne Begeny, MS, RN, Director of
Government Affairs, American Association
of Colleges of Nursing

Georges Benjamin, MD, FACP, FACEP(E),
Executive Director, American Public Health
Association

Bob Berenson, MD, Senior Fellow, Urban
Institute

Ron Bialek, MPP, President, Public Health
Foundation

Michael Bird, PhD, MSW, MPH, Private
Consultant

Jessica Donze Black, RD, MPH, Executive
Director, Campaign to End Obesity

Jim Blumenstock, Chief Program Officer,
Public Health Practice, Association of State
and Territorial Health Officials

Ramon Bonzon, MPH, Program Associate,
National Association of County and City
Health Officials

Jo Ivey Boufford, MD, President, The New
York Academy of Medicine

Courtney Brein, Policy Associate, The New
York Academy of Medicine

Roderick Bremby, MPA, Secretary, Kansas
Department of Health and Environment

Russell Brewer, DrPH, MPH, CHES,
Program Associate, Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation

Eli Briggs, Senior Government Affairs
Specialist, National Association of County
and City Health Officials

Charlotte Brody, RN, Executive Director,
Commonweal

Carol Brown, MS, Senior Advisor, National
Association of County and City Health
Officials

Donna Brown, JD, MPH, Government
Affairs Counsel and Senior Advisor for
Public Affairs, National Association of
County and City Health Officials

Maureen Budetti, MA, Director of Student
Aid Policy, National Association of
Independent Colleges and Universities

Charlene Burgeson, Executive Director,
National Association for Sport as Physical
Education

Terry Buss, PhD, Director, International
Studies, National Academy of Public
Administration

Jeremy Cantor, MPH, Program Manager,
Prevention Institute

David Chavis, PhD, Principal Associate and
CEO, Association for the Study and
Development of Community

The Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) would like to thank all of theexperts and organizations who contributed to the development of the
Blueprint. The opinions expressed in the Blueprint do not necessarily repre-

sent the views of these individuals or organizations.

5

Mary Gardner Clagett, Deputy Director for
Policy, Workforce Development Strategies
Group, National Center on Education and
the Economy

Gabriel Cohen, Former Policy Associate,
The New York Academy of Medicine

Larry Cohen, MSW, Executive Director,
Prevention Institute

John Colbert, JD, Senior Counsel, Workforce
Development Strategies Group, National
Center on Education and the Economy

Carrie Cornwell, Chief Consultant,
Transportation and Housing Committee,
California State Senate

Bill Corr, JD, Executive Director,
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Rachel Davis, MSW, Managing Director,
Prevention Institute

Daniel Dawes, JD, Senior Legislative and
Federal Affairs Officer, Public Interest
Policy, American Psychological Association

Linda Degutis, DrPH, MSN, Research
Director, Yale Center for Public Health
Preparedness

Pat DeLeon, PhD, JD, MPH, Chief of Staff,
Senator Daniel Inouye

Nancy-Ann DeParle, JD, MA, Managing
Director, CCMP Capital, LLC

Abby Dilley, MS, Senior Mediator,
RESOLVE

Helen DuPlessis, MD, MPH, Assistant
Professor, UCLA School of Medicine and
School of Public Health

John Dwyer, JD, Special Advisor, Arent Fox

Thomas Elwood, DrPH, Executive
Director, Association of Schools of Allied
Health Professions

Gerard Farrell, Executive Director,
Commissioned Officers Association of the
U.S. Public Health Service

Gerri Fiala, Former Director of Workforce
Research, Workforce Development
Strategies Group, National Center on
Education and the Economy

Ruth Finkelstein, ScD, Vice President for
Health Policy, The New York Academy of
Medicine

Sarah Flanagan, MAT, Vice President for
Government Relations and Policy, National
Association of Independent Colleges and
Universities

David Fleming, MD, Director of Public
Health, Seattle King County Public Health

Sheila Franklin, Director, National
Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity

Mark Friedman, Director, Fiscal Policy
Studies Institute

Ana Garcia, MPA, Policy Associate, The
New York Academy of Medicine

Parris Glendening, President, Smart
Growth Leadership Institute

Eric Goplerud, PhD, MA, Research
Professor, George Washington University
School of Public Health and Health Services

Steve Gunderson, President and CEO,
Council on Foundations

Paul Halverson, DrPH, FACHE, Director
and State Health Officer, Arkansas
Department of Health

Peggy Hamburg, MD, Senior Scientist, NTI

Dennis Harrington, Deputy Division
Director, North Carolina Division of Public
Health

Susan Hattan, MA, Senior Consultant,
National Association of Independent
Colleges and Universities

Audrey Haynes, MSW, Senior Vice
President for Government Relations, YMCA
of the USA

Karen Helsing, MHS, Director, Educational
Programs, Association of Schools of Public
Health

Jane Henney, MD, Professor for Health Affairs,
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Peggy Honore, DHA, Associate Professor,
University of Southern Mississippi

Mark Horton, MD, MPH, State Public
Health Officer, California Department of
Public Health

Anthony Iton, MD, JD, MPH, Director and
Health Officer, Alameda County
Department of Public Health

Megan Ix, Research Assistant,
AcademyHealth

Paul Jarris, MD, MBA, Executive Director,
Association of State and Territorial Health
Officials

Grantland Johnson, Special Advisor,
Strategy Policy, Community Housing
Opportunities Corporation

6

Nancy Johnson, Senior Public Policy
Advisor, Baker/Donelson

Bill Kamela, Senior Director for Education
and Workforce, Law and Corporate Affairs,
Microsoft

Martha Katz, MPA, Director of Health
Policy, Healthcare Georgia Foundation

Rita Kelliher, MSPH, Director, Grants and
Contracts, Association of Schools of Public
Health

Norma Kent, Vice President of
Communications, American Association of
Community Colleges

Andrew Kessler, JD Principal, Slingshot
Solutions, Inc.

David Kindig, MD, PhD, Emeritus Professor
of Population Health Sciences and Emeritus
Vice-Chancellor for Health Sciences,
University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of
Medicine

Laura Rasar King, MPH, CHES, Executive
Director, Council on Education for Public
Health

Yvonne Knight, Director, Government
Relations, National Academy of Public
Administration

Chris Koyanagi, Policy Director, Bazelon
Center for Mental Health Law

Vinnie Lafronza, EdD, MS, Co-Principal
and Founder, CommonHealth ACTION

Nina Leavitt, EdD, Associate Executive
Director for Government Relations,
Education Directorate, American
Psychological Association

Melissa Lewis, MPH, Analyst, Public
Health, Association of State and Territorial
Health Officials

Patrick Libbey, Executive Director,
National Association of County and City
Health Officials

Marsha Lillie-Blanton, DrPH, Senior Advisor,
Commission to Build a Healthier America

Nicole Lurie, MD, MSPH, Senior Natural
Scientist and Co-Director for Public Health
at the Center for Domestic and
International Health Security, RAND

Ron Manderscheid, PhD, Global Health
Sector, Director of Mental Health and
Substance Use Programs, SRA International

Jim Marks, MD, MPH, Senior Vice
President, Director Health Group, Robert
Wood Johnson Foundation

Joe Marx, Senior Communications Officer,
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Barbara Masters, MA, Public Policy
Director, The California Endowment

Glen Mays, MPH, PhD, Department of
Health Policy and Management, Fay W.
Boozman College of Public Health

James McKenney, Vice President for
Economic Development, American
Association of Community Colleges

Leslie Mikkelsen, MPH, Managing
Director, Public Health Institute

Wilhelmine Miller, MS, PhD, Associate
Staff Director, Commission to Build a
Healthier America

Mark Mioduski, MPA, Vice President,
Cornerstone Government Affairs

Jack Moran, MBA, MS, PhD, Senior
Quality Advisor, Public Health Foundation

Joyal Mulheron, MS, Program Director,
Public Health, National Governors
Association

Fran Murphy, MD, Independent Consultant

Poki Stewart Namkung, MD, MPH, Health
Officer, County of Santa Cruz

Sandy Naylor-Goodwin, PhD, Executive
Director, California Institute for Mental
Health

Julie Netherland, MSW, Policy Associate,
The New York Academy of Medicine

Carmen Nevarez, MD, MPH, Vice
President for External Relations and
Preventive Medicine Advisor, Public Health
Institute

Kathleen Nolan, MPH, Director, Health
Division, National Governors Association

Delia Olufokunbi, PhD, MS, Assistant
Research Professor, Department of Health
Policy and Deputy Director of the Center
for Integrated Behavioral Health Policy,
George Washington University School of
Public Health and Health Services

Barbara Ormond, PhD, Senior Research
Associate, Urban Institute

Tara O’Tooke, MD, MPH, Chief Executive
Officer and Director, Center for Biosecurity

Kate Froeb Papa, MPH, Senior Manager,
AcademyHealth

Scott Pattison, Executive Director, National
Association of State Budget Officers

7

Jim Pearsol, Chief Program Officer, Public
Health Performance, Association of State
and Territorial Health Officials

Robert Phillips, MPA, MPH, Senior
Program Officer, The California
Endowment

Sylvia Pirani, MPH, Director, Office of
Local Health Services, New York State
Department of Health

Alonzo Plough, MA, MPH, PhD, Vice
President, Strategy, Planning, and
Evaluation, The California Endowment

Susan Polan, PhD, Associate Executive
Director, Public Affairs and Advocacy,
American Public Health Association

John Porter, JD, M.Ed, Partner, Hogan and
Hartson

Margaret Potter, JD, Associate Dean
and Director, Center for Public Health
Practice, University of Pittsburgh, School
of Public Health

Stephanie Powers, Project Director,
National Fund for Workforce Solutions

Carol Rasco, MA, President and CEO,
Reading is Fundamental

Judith Rensberger, MS, MPH, Government
Relations Director, Commissioned Officers
Association of the U.S. Public Health Service

Robert Rosseter, Associate Executive
Director, American Association of Colleges
of Nursing

Pamela Russo, MD, MPH, Senior Program
Officer, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Judy Salerno, MD, SM, Executive Officer,
the Institute of Medicine of the National
Academies

Eduardo Sanchez, MD, MPH, Director,
Institute for Health Policy, University of
Texas School of Public Health

Bill Schultz, JD, Partner, Zuckerman Spaeder

David Shern, PhD, President and CEO,
Mental Health America

Gillian Silver, MPH, Manager, Research
and Educational Programs, Association of
Schools of Public Health

Paul Simon, MD, MPH, Director, Division
of Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention,
Los Angeles County Department of Public
Health

Brian Smedley, PhD, Former Research
Director and Co-Founder, Opportunity
Agenda

Jennifer Beard Smulson, Senior Legislative
and Federal Affairs Officer, Government
Relations Office, Education Directorate,
American Psychological Association

Gene Sofer, Partner, The Susquehanna
Group

Byron Sogie-Thomas, MS, Director of
Health Policy, National Medical Association

Brenda Spillman, PhD, Senior Research
Associate, Urban Institute

Janani Srikantharajah, Program Assistant,
Prevention Institute

Laurel Stine, MS, JD, Director of Federal
Relations, Bazelon Center for Mental
Health Law

Robin Squellati, RN, MSN, NP, Colonel,
U.S. Air Force Nurse Corps; Detailee to the
Office of U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye

David Sundwall, MD, Executive Director,
Utah Department of Health

Mike Taylor, JD, Research Professor,
George Washington University School of
Public Health and Health Services

Pat Taylor, Executive Director, Faces &
Voices of Recovery

Bob Templin, Jr., PhD, President,
Northern Virginia Community College
(NOVA)

Annie Toro, JD, MPH, Associate Executive
Director for Government Relations, Public
Interest Directorate, American
Psychological Association

Ho Luong Tran, PhD, President and CEO,
Asian and Pacific Islander American Health
Forum

John Vasquez, Solano County Supervisor

Rajeev Venkayya, MD, Former Special
Assistant to the President and Senior
Director for Biodefense, White House
Homeland Security Council

Tim Waidmann, PhD, Senior Research
Associate, Urban Institute

Tracy Wiedt, MPH, Program Manager,
YMCA of the USA

9

Today, serious gaps exist in the nation’s ability
to safeguard health, putting our families, com-
munities, states, and nation at risk.

� Seven years after September 11, 2001, and
three years after Hurricane Katrina, major
problems remain in our readiness to re-
spond to large-scale health emergencies.
The country is still insufficiently prepared
to protect people from disease outbreaks,
natural disasters, or acts of bioterrorism,
leaving Americans unnecessarily vulnera-
ble to these threats.

� Even though America spends more than
$2 trillion annually on health care – – more
than any other nation in the world – – tens
of millions of Americans suffer every day
from preventable illnesses and chronic dis-
eases like cancer, diabetes, and
Alzheimer’s that rob them of health and
quality of life. Racial, ethnic and eco-
nomic disparities exacerbate the burden
of disease. Baby boomers may be the first
generation to live less healthy lives than
their parents. And, the obesity crisis is put-

ting millions of adults and children at risk
for unprecedented levels of major diseases
like diabetes and heart disease.

� Poor health is putting the nation’s eco-
nomic security in jeopardy. The skyrock-
eting costs of health care threaten to
bankrupt American businesses, causing
some companies to send jobs to other
countries where costs are lower. Helping
people to stay healthy and better manage
illnesses are the best ways to drive down
health care costs. Keeping the American
workforce well helps American businesses
remain competitive in the global economy.

America must provide quality, affordable
health care to all. But that’s not enough.
The government must create strategies to
eliminate health disparities and improve the
health of all Americans, regardless of race,
ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. A strong
public health system and public policies fo-
cused on prevention of disease and injur y
must be part of the solution.

A. OUR VISION FOR A HEALTHIER AMERICA

The Problem and Need for Action

America should strive to be the healthiest nation in the world. Every American should have the opportunity to be as healthy as he or she
can be. Every community should be safe from threats to its health. And all

individuals and families should have a high level of services that protect, pro-

mote, and preserve their health, regardless of who they are or where they live.

To realize these goals, the nation must strengthen America’s public health sys-

tem in order to: 1) provide people with the information, resources, and envi-

ronment they need to make healthier choices and live healthier lives, and 2)

protect people from health threats beyond their control, such as bioterrorism,

natural disasters, infectious disease outbreaks, and environmental hazards.

Achieving this vision will require the combined efforts of federal, state, and

local governments in partnership with businesses, communities, and citizens.

10

Preventing and combating threats to our
health is the primary responsibility of our na-
tion’s public health system. The public
health system consists of health agencies at
the federal, state, and local levels of govern-

ment that work in collaboration with health
care providers, businesses, and community
partners. Achieving a healthier America re-
quires a national commitment to revitalizing
and modernizing the public health system.

Guiding Principles for Prevention

� Our support for health care has focused
for too long on caring for people after
they become sick or harmed. Prevention
means improving the quality of people’s
lives, sparing individuals from needless suf-
fering, and eliminating unnecessary costs
from our health system.

� Fundamentals like investigating epidemics,
educating the public about health risks,
early screening for disease, and immuniza-
tions are proven to help prevent and re-
duce the rates of illness and disease. A
greater emphasis on prevention could sig-
nificantly reduce rates of chronic illness.

1. We believe prevention must drive our nation’s health strategy.

� By supporting policies and programs like
promoting healthier schools, smoke-free
environments, and improved community
design, the government can do more to
meet its responsibility to help citizens lead
healthier lives.

� The government must protect air, water, and
food; minimize chemical exposures; and pro-
vide communities healthier environments.

2. We believe Americans deserve healthy and safe places to live, work, and play.

� The federal government’s role is to ensure
that the public health system has sufficient
resources and meets basic standards for
protecting the public’s health. Govern-
ment at all levels must also be held ac-

countable for the health and safety of the
American people. And, the government
must show that it is spending public health
dollars effectively and in ways that clearly
improve the public’s health and safety.

4. We believe Americans deserve to know what government is doing to keep them
healthy and safe.

� A basic role of government is to protect us
and our health from threats like bioter-

rorism and infectious disease outbreaks,
and to keep our food supply safe.

3. We believe every community should be prepared to meet the threats of infectious
disease, bioterrorism, and natural disasters.

11

AARP • Active for Life • AIDS Action Council • Allergy & Asthma Network Mothers of
Asthmatics • Alliance for Healthy Homes • America Walks • American Academy of Pediatrics
• American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance • American
Association for Homecare • American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. •
American Cancer Society-Cancer Action Network • American College of Clinical Pharmacy •
American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine • American College of
Preventive Medicine • American Diabetes Association • American Federation of State, County
and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) • American Heart Association • American Institute for
Medical and Biological Engineering • American Lung Association • American Nurses
Association • American Osteopathic Association • American Optometric Association •
American Pharmacists Association • American Public Health Association • American Red
Cross • American School Health Association • American Tai Chi Association • Amputee
Coalition of America • Association for Prevention Teaching and Research • Association for
Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology • Association of Maternal and Child
Health …

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